Ah, London Bridge. Is it just me, or is this the one place where the wind whips through with vengeance? The “Friends of the River Thames” group is not too pleased with me because I have lost hats, umbrellas, a scarf, and almost a camera due to the wind here. Is there a “Friends of the River Thames” organisation? It would not surprise me if there is. Hmm… When the temperatures are cold in London, it is colder here for sure. Bundle up and hold your belongings tight if you plan to spend time on the bridge.

But, don’t let Mother Nature’s punch of a breeze deter you from choosing London Bridge as a place to stop to enjoy the views or take some great photographs. The bridge is a great spot, especially with Tower Bridge, London City Hall, the More London Estate, the Shard, and Southwark Cathedral in perfect view. This bridge, too, has a fantastic ledge to steady your camera. Do, however, put the camera strap around your neck for safe keeping. One bump from a passerby, a wrong whip of the wind, or one slight act of carelessness will send your camera diving into the River Thames. The edge of London Bridge is slick.

I make this sound like a daunting location, though it really is superb. Walking across London Bridge should be on your list of things to do in London. I will often venture across the bridge, then walk to The Monument to the Great Fire of London, then continue up into the City of London for night photography. Don’t forget to step down in front of Old Billingsgate as this offers brilliant views of the Shard and Tower Bridge and you’ll be directly on the River Thames as well.

The current London Bridge opened in 1973. The original bridge in this location dates back to 1176 tho’ a few bridges replaced this throughout hundreds of years. The last bridge, completed in 1831, began sinking at the rate of an inch every eight years. By 1924, the east side of the bridge was three to four inches lower than the west side. The bridge had not been designed to withstand 20th-century automotive traffic.

In 1967, the Common Council of the City of London began to look for potential buyers for the London Bridge. Enter, Robert P McCulloch of Lake Havasu City, Arizona, who placed the winning bid of $2,460,000. And, the rest is history.

Today, there are two London Bridges. One in London connecting Southwark to the City of London and the second London Bridge in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

Map Showing The Location of London Bridge

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