The London Eye is one of the more recent icons to be added to the City.  Who would have guessed a Ferris wheel, constructed for the beginning of the Millennium, would become not only a top attraction but a symbol easily identifying London?  When it first went up, many Londoners grumbled (as they do), but now it would be difficult to imagine the Southbank without it.

If you are visiting London for the first time, add the London Eye to your list of things to do.  The Eye is a destination that is easy to get to, and there is plenty of other attractions in the immediate area.  From the London Eye (and on a clear day) you’ll see The City of London, St Paul’s Cathedral, BT Tower, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey, Big Ben, Westminster Palace and the meandering Thames River.  Take your camera as your ride the London Eye because the views are unparalleled.  It takes about an hour to complete a rotation when you ride the London Eye, so be prepared for this.  I suggest purchasing your fast-track ticket in advance to avoid long queues.

When you are on the ground, however, how many ways can the London Eye be photographed?  Do a search, and you’ll see.  Would it be safe to say there are millions of photos of The London Eye?

That said one of my London Night Photography stops, far too many times, has been this very same big Ferris wheel on the south bank of the Thames River.  I’ve found brilliant views from the Golden Jubilee Bridge (west side),  Westminster Bridge, behind the London Eye toward Waterloo Station, and across the river on Victoria Embankment.  Too, walk anywhere along the Queen’s Walk and you will find suitable views.  You can see an assortment of my London Eye images below.

So, how many ways can YOU photograph the London Eye?

Long Exposure Photo of London UK
Long Exposure Photo of London UK
LONDON AT NIGHT
LONDON AT NIGHT

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