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The Gentleman Wayfarer

Browsing

ballerina statue and red phone boxes in broad court

Once you’ve exhausted the photo opportunities at Covent Garden, be sure to venture further.  Take any number of streets and wander.  You can’t go wrong in any direction to find some of the best places to photograph London.

The Royal Opera House is adjacent in Bow Street on the northeast side of Covent Garden.  

low angle view royal opera house london

A walk northward along James Street will take you to the Covent Garden Underground Station and Long Acre.  Along this walk you’ll find numerous street performers and numerous opportunities for street photography.  

Once you reach Long Acre veer slightly to the right and you’ll find Neal Street.  Follow Neal Street northward and this is where the fun begins.  Neal’s Yard, narrow streets that are mostly empty at night and Seven Dials.  Each area is unique and will allow you to use your creative photographic eye.

Begin your journey at Covent Garden.
The GPS Coordinates for Covent Garden Are :: 51.5117° N, 0.1240° W

Map Showing the Location of Covent Garden

low angle view of covent garden piazza

Central London is like Disneyland for photographers.  Almost everywhere you turn you will find one of the best places to photograph London.   Covent Garden is no exception.  

If you are interested in street photography, visit this top tourist attraction during the day into early evening.  There will be plenty of visitors and street performers waiting to be unknowingly captured when you click your shutter button.  If you’re keen to capture the city void of people and appreciate London’s old architecture, be sure to visit after dark.

It’s obvious I love London night photography.  I perfected the craft by spending innumerable hours exploring the city at night.  Covent Garden is one of my top London photo areas as I love the cobblestones, the low angle perspective, the simple architecture and columns as well as the open space around the perimeter of the piazza.  You can spend hours at this famous market turned retail space.

You have to love Covent Garden for its history and I can’t help but visualize the fictional Eliza Doolittle singing “Wouldn’t It Be Luverly” on the doorstep of St Paul’s Church in the wee hours of the morning.

st paul's church covent garden

Be sure to move all about the perimeter of the piazza as well as stepping inside as the glass roofs are great fun.  When the building illuminates at night, magic happens that only a photographer would appreciate.  

The Covent Garden Piazza  offers ample photo opportunities.  Take your time.  Go high.  Go low.  Go when or after it rains.    The area is very safe tho’ don’t be surprised if a passerby asks what you’re doing.  A lady once got down on the ground to see what I was doing and then told me I was a spy.  Also, don’t be surprised if a concerned policeman stops to ask if you’re ok especially if you’re lying on the ground. 

Where is Covent Garden?  How Do I Get To Covent Garden?
Covent Garden GPS Coordinates :: 51.5117° N, 0.1240° W

Map Showing the Location of Covent Garden:
Map Showing Location of Covent Garden

photo of london county hall at night

London County Hall is a grand building along the Thames River that was once home to the London Council.  Like any good city revitalisation, the county hall is now an entertainment centre and home to two hotels.   It is now the home of the London Sea Life Aquarium, London Dungeon, a Marriott Hotel and Premiere Inn.  If you don’t know the building as the London County Hall building, you certainly know the London Eye sits right next to it.

photo of london eye and london county hall across river thames

The building is on the South Bank of the River Thames and reflects beautifully in the water when it is illuminated at night.  It faces west toward the City of Westminster and is close to the Palace of Westminster.  Stand in front of the building and you’ll have nice photographic views of Big Ben and the House of Parliament building.  Westminster Bridge is directly next to the county hall building, heading south.  The area is easily reached via Waterloo or Westminster London Underground stations.

Grab your camera and be ready for a photographic feast in this area.  If you like architectural features, be close to the building.  For a wider view, be sure to cross over Westminster Bridge to Victoria Embankment to capture images across the Thames River.  You will want to stop along the way as the views from Westminster Bridge are incredible.  You’ll have super photo opportunities of Big Ben, the Palace of Westminster, London County Hall, the London Eye as well as the fabulous Golden Jubilee Bridges.

All along Victoria Embankment you’ll find a low and wide sturdy wall with a ledge.  So, if you’re without your tripod for night photography, you’ll have no problem whatsoever.  You’ll find a fantastic view of London County Hall and the city’s newest icon, The London Eye.  Visit at night to be treated to colorful reflections from the illuminated buildings across the water.  And don’t forget, the lights from the Golden Jubilee Bridges and Westminster Bridge are nice as well.  What’s more, is you can also capture light trails from boats as they pass down river.

side view of london county hall and london eye

Where is London County Hall?  Where Do I Find London County Hall?
London County Hall GPS Coordinates :: 51.5011° N, 0.1192° W

Map Showing the Location of London County Hall
map showing london county hall and london eye

 

the scoop in more london estates in london

The Scoop is an entertainment amphitheatre set below the surface near London’s City Hall.  It is set amongst the More London Estate along the River Thames.

The More London Estate area is in itself a treasure trove of London photo opportunities if you appreciate  modern architecture.  A plethora of  angular glass building surround The Scoop for you to practice your architecture photography skills.

The Scoop itself looks as though the City Hall building was dipped into the ground and when it was pulled out, a cool entertainment venue was created.  Steps lead down into the stone stage area and are illuminated with blue light.  A large rounded contemporary railing surrounds the perimeter of the amphitheatre which offers you the chance to test your creativity. 

Keep your eye open as you move around.  One key tip is do indeed move about.  Go down steps into the amphitheatre; walk around the wide perimeter of The Scoop; and be aware of your surroundings.   With each step you will find a new wonderful photograph to capture.  

Your keen photography eye will find The Shard, the City of London, Tower Bridge, London City Hall, and numerous modern buildings as backgrounds while you are capturing The Scoop. 

I have spent many an hour photographing  The Scoop at More London and City Hall.   The curves are brilliant.  The blue hues emanating from the large railing are fabulous.  You can’t go wrong.  Move all the way around and keep your photographer eye open.  There is a photo to be taken everywhere.  This area is indeed one of the best places to photograph London.

Where is The Scoop?  How Do I Get To The Scoop?

The Scoop GPS Coordinates : 51.5050534,-0.0813969,17

Map Showing The Location of The Scoop at More London :

The Scoop in London Map

London inspires many to write compelling thoughts and anecdotes just as the grand city on the Thames inspires me to photograph her night after night.  Some words are one-off’s while others are part of timeless pieces of literature.  I’ve combined famous London quotes with my own night images of London for the ultimate list of London quotes.  Feel free to add your suggestions in the comment section below.

 London is the epitome of our times, and the Rome of today.  
– Ralph Waldo Emerson, Conduct of Life

When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.  
-Samuel Johnson

Go where we may rest where we will, Eternal London haunts us still.  
– Thomas Moore, “Rhymes on the Road”, The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore

Take a perfect day, add six hours of rain and fog, and you have instant London.    
– Anonymous

London’s like a black-browed brute that gets an unholy influence over you.
– Robert Smythe Hichens, The Woman with the Fan

London is the clearing-house of the world.
– Joseph Chamberlain, speech at Guildhall, London, Jan. 19, 1904

Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner that I love London so.

There’s nowhere else like London, nothing at all.  Anywhere.

I think London is sexy because it’s so full of eccentrics.

It is the folly of too many to mistake the echo of a London coffee house for the voice of a kingdom.

 A broken heart is a very pleasant complaint for a man in London if he has a comfortable income.

If London is a watercolour, New York is an oil painting.

London is a splendid place to live for those who can get out of it.

Nothing is certain in London but expense.

A person who is tired of London isn’t necessarily tired of life.  It might be that he just can’t find a parking place.

I’ve been walking about London for the last thirty years, and I find something fresh in it every day.

There are two places in the world where men can most effectively disappear – the City of London and the South Seas.

Oh, I love London society.  It is composed now of beautiful idiots and brilliant lunatics, just what a society should be.

And there is London!–England’s heart and soul.
By the proud flowing of her famous Thames,
She circulates through countless lands and isles
Her greatness; gloriously she rules,
At once the awe and sceptre of the world.
– Robert Montgomery

I love thee, London! for thy many men,
And for thy mighty deeds and scenes of glory.
– Philip James Bailey

 London is a city that has reinvented itself upon the remains of the past.
– Leo Hollis, London Rising: The Men Who Made Modern London

London isn’t a stodgy place. Trend-setting London is to the United Kingdom what New York City is to the United States: the spot where everything happens first (or ultimately ends up).
– Donald Olson, England For Dummies

London goes beyond any boundary or convention. It contains every wish or word ever spoken, every action or gesture ever made, every harsh or noble statement ever expressed. It is illimitable. It is Infinite London.
– Peter Ackroyd, London: The Biography

London is a cluster of communities, great and small, famous and unsung; a city of contrasts, a congregation of diversity.
– Roy Porter, London: A Social History

The English mist is always at work like a subtle painter, and London is a vast canvas prepared for the mist to work on.
– Arthur Symons, Cities and Sea-Coasts and Islands

London is a huge shop, with a hotel on the upper storeys.
– George Gissing, New Grub Street

London is a bad habit one hates to lose.  
– Anonymous

Spare London, for London, is like the city that thou lovedst.
– Thomas Nash, Christ’s Tears Over Jerusalem

London is a roost for every bird.  
– Benjamin Disraeli, Lothair

And London shops on Christmas Eve
Are strung with silver bells and flowers
As hurrying clerks the City leave
To pigeon-haunted classic towers,
And marbled clouds go scudding by
The many-steepled London sky
– John Betjeman, “Christmas”

 London is like a smoky pearl set in a circle of emeralds.
– William Henry Rideing, In the Land of Lorna Doone

London’s like a forest … we shall be lost in it.  
– Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Taken at the Flood

London is a splendid place to live in for those who can get out of it.
– George John Gordon Bruce, The Observer, Oct. 1, 1944

London is like a woman with too many years to encourage confession.
– Louise Closser Hale, We Discover New England

The streets of London have their map, but our passions are uncharted. What are you going to meet if you turn this corner?   – Virginia Woolf, Jacob’s Room

I had neither kith nor kin in England, and was therefore as free as air – or as free as an income of eleven shillings and sixpence a day will permit a man to be. Under such circumstances, I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained.
– Arthur Conan Doyle

Paris is a woman but London is an independent man puffing his pipe in a pub.    
– Jack Kerouac, Lonesome Traveler

If the parks are “the lungs of London” we wonder what Greenwich Fair is — a periodical breaking out, we suppose — a sort of spring rash.
–  Charles Dickens, Greenwich Fair

You are now
In London, that great sea, whose ebb and flow
At once is deaf and loud and on the shore
Vomits its wrecks, and still howls on for more.
Yet in its depth what treasures!
– Percy Bysshe Shelley,  letter to Maria Gisborne, 1820

I journeyed to London, to the time kept City,
Where the River flows, with foreign flotations.
There I was told: we have too many churches,
And too few chop-houses.
– T. S. Eliot, The Rock

 London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained.  
– Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet

There’s a hole in the world
Like a great black pit
And the vermin of the world
Inhabit it …
And it goes by the name of London.
– Stephen Sondheim, Sweeney Todd

London is a city of clubs and private houses. You have to be a member.
– Alec Waugh, The Sugar Islands

The truth is, that in London it is always a sickly season. Nobody is healthy in London, nobody can be.    
– Jane Austen, Emma

London is an endless skirmish between angles and emptiness.
– China Mieville, Kraken

London opens to you like a novel itself… It is divided into chapters, the chapters into scenes, the scenes into sentences; it opens to you like a series of rooms, door, passage, door. Mayfair to Piccadilly to Soho to the Strand.  
– Anna Quindlen, Imagined London

London, thou art the flower of cities all! Gemme of all joy, Jasper of jocundity.
– William Dunbar

I don’t know what London’s coming to — the higher the buildings the lower the morals.
– Noël Coward

When it’s three o’clock in New York, it’s still 1938 in London.
– Bette Midler, attributed, The Unofficial Guide to London

London is like a cold dark dream sometimes.
 – Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea

 My Dad says that being a Londoner has nothing to do with where you’re born. He says that there are people who get off a jumbo jet at Heathrow, go through immigration waving any kind of passport, hop on the tube and by the time the train’s pulled into Piccadilly Circus they’ve become a Londoner.  
– Ben Aaronovitch, Moon Over Soho

One of the things she most liked about the city -apart from all its obvious attractions, the theatre, the galleries, the exhilarating walks by the river- was that so few people ever asked you personal questions.
– Julia Gregson

A mighty mass of brick, and smoke, and shipping, / Dirty and dusty, but as wide as eye / Could reach, with here and there a sail just skipping / In sight, then lost amidst the forestry / Of masts; a wilderness of steeples peeping / On tiptoe through their sea-coal canopy; / A huge, dun cupola, like a foolscap crown / On a fool’s head – and there is London Town.
– Lord Byron

The man who can dominate a London dinner-table can dominate the world.
– Oscar Wilde

It is my belief, Watson, founded upon my experience, that the lowest and vilest alleys in London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside.
– Arthur Conan Doyle

The truth is, that in London it is always a sickly season. Nobody is healthy in London, nobody can be.
– Jane Austen

In London, love and scandal are considered the best sweeteners of tea.
– John Osborne

This melancholy London – I sometimes imagine that the souls of the lost are compelled to walk through its streets perpetually. One feels them passing like a whiff of air.
– William Butler Yeats

The English language is like London: proudly barbaric yet deeply civilised, too, common yet royal, vulgar yet processional, sacred yet profane.
– Stephen Fry

Do you realise that people die of boredom in London suburbs? It’s the second biggest cause of death amongst the English in general. Sheer boredom.
– Alexander McCall Smith

 If London is a watercolour, New York is an oil painting.
– Peter Shaffer

Nothing is certain in London but expense.
– William Shenstone

You will recognize, my boy, the first sign of old age: it is when you go out into the streets of London and realize for the first time how young the policemen look. –
Sir Seymour Hicks

I like the spirit of this great London which I feel around me. Who but a coward would pass his whole life in hamlets, and forever abandon his faculties to the eating rust of obscurity?
– Charlotte Brontë

There’s a hole in the world / Like a great black pit / And the vermin of the world / Inhabit it / And it goes by the name of London.
– Stephen Sondheim in Sweeney Todd

I’m leaving because the weather is too good. I hate London when it’s not raining.
– Groucho Marx

London, London, London town / You can toughen up or get thrown around.
– Kano

I believe we shall come to care about people less and less. The more people one knows the easier it becomes to replace them. It’s one of the curses of London.
– Ambrose Bierce

It is not the walls that make the city, but the people who live within them. The walls of London may be battered, but the spirit of the Londoner stands resolute and undismayed.
– George VI

Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner,
That I love London so;
Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner,
That I think of her wherever I go.
I get a funny feeling inside of me,
Just walking up and down;
Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner,
That I love London town.
– Hubert Gregg, “Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner”

 A broken heart is a very pleasant complaint for a man in London if he has a comfortable income.
– George Bernard Shaw

In London everyone is different and that means anyone can fit in.

The English language is like London: proudly barbaric yet deeply civilised.

By seeing London, I have seen as much of life as the world can show.

I came to London.  It had become the centre of my world and I was lost.

One thing about London is that when you step out into the night, it swallows you.    
– Sebastian Saulks, Engleby

There are two places in the world where men can most effectively disappear — the city of London and the South Seas.
– Herman Melville

The best bribe which London offers to-day to the imagination, is, that, in such a vast variety of people and conditions, one can believe there is room for persons of romantic character to exist, and that the poet, the mystic, and the hero may hope to confront their counterparts.
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

You are now / In London, that great sea, whose ebb and flow / At once is deaf and loud, and on the shore / Vomits its wrecks, and still howls on for more / Yet in its depth what treasures!
– Percy Bysshe Shelley

London is a modern Babylon.
– Benjamin Disraeli

The London Underground network and UK train system are busy during ‘rush hour’ with commuters moving around the city.  People furiously zig zag through the stations with one aim in mind – getting to their destination as quickly as possible and with minimal frustration.  Anyone in their way is an annoyance whether you’re a tourist or not.

You can expect the trains and stations to be overcrowded in the morning and after work in the evening.  Note to self: Avoid Underground and train stations during rush hour.  Take a walk and enjoy London.  And by doing so, you’ll start your own day void of frustration and make life easier for London commuters at the same time.

Video of Victoria Station During Morning Rush Hour

The London Underground is an engineering marvel.  It is one of the best and most comprehensive transport networks in the world with around 24 million journeys made each day.  Can you imagine?   So, it’s important that everything runs smoothly to avoid delays.

You can help by following these top London travel tips to learn what to expect when you arrive and how to use the Tube like a Londoner.

1. When On An Escalator, Stand to the Right
Londoners love their rules, even if they are not written.  London Underground asks that you stand on the right when using the escalators and leave the left free for others to walk down. If you’re travelling in a big group, or with lots of shopping bags, stand and stay right and let others pass you – it will speed up the process and be a more pleasant journey for everyone.

2. Unless You Want To People Watch, Avoid Travelling During Rush Hour
If you can, avoid using the London Underground during morning and evening rush hours.  The tube network is very busy during ‘rush hour’ with commuters moving around the city. You can expect the trains and stations to be overcrowded between 07:30 and 09:30 in the morning and between 17:00 and 19:00 in the evening.  You’ll enjoy London more by taking a walk instead.

3. Have Your Oyster Card or Ticket Ready at the Ticket Barrier
There is nothing more frustrating for rush hour commuters to be behind a ticket fumbler.  Sometimes there can be a bit of a bottleneck at ticket barriers, especially before 9.30am and around 6 pm during the rush hours. Make sure you have your ticket ready at the barrier so you can move in and out of the station smoothly.   Better yet, buy an Oyster Card so you can tap in and tap out at the ticket barrier.  You can also buy an Oyster Card online.

4. No Fuss Needed. If You Get On The Wrong Train or Miss Your Stop, Enjoy the Ride and Simply Go Back
If you’ve caught the wrong tube or missed your stop – don’t get nervous.  Either return where you started or look at your map to re-route your journey.  I’m an experienced Underground traveller and I often make the most of my goof.  Most of the time I go up the escalator, out the door and walk the rest of my journey.

5. Please Move Down The Platform
As you enter the station platform you will often find more room if you walk down to the ends of the platform.  So true.  If a platform is busy, I always make it rule to walk to the end of the platform.  The train carriages are usually the emptiest as well, perfect if you’re looking for a place to sit.  Plus, it passes the time you need to wait before the next train arrives.

6. Please Don’t Rush A Train.  Let Passengers Off the Train First
I’ll be on a train and when the doors open for me to leave, people rush on before letting passengers off.  I experience this over and over again.  It helps to let people off the tube before you board it; allowing more room for you to get on and passengers to alight the train.  Everyone is in a rush.  Please be patient.  The train won’t leave without you.

7. Check Line Closures and Listen to the Announcements Inside a Station
If possible, check ahead and plan your journey to make sure there are no delays or closures on the lines you need to travel – especially at the weekends when maintenance work is common.  It’s no fun to show up at an Underground station only to learn the line you want to take is closed.  It happens.  Also pay attention to potential Tube Strikes.  It’s the weekend, Enjoy glorious London and take a walk.  While you’re in a station, announcements are made on a constant basis.  Sometimes the voices are garbled.  Ask a member of staff if you’re unsure if the line you want to use is running as scheduled.

8. Carry a Bottle of Water and Pack a Snack
The London Underground is over 150 years old.  I could say enough said, but keep in mind air-conditioning is not the norm underground.  During summertime, the temperature can be unbearable in the stations and on the Tube.  Be prepared and carry water with you wherever you go in London.

9. Mind Your Belongings, Your Step and the Gap
Watch your bag and your belongings.  There are nefarious types in every large city and London is no exception.  A good rule is to keep your purse, bag or backpack to the front of you when you’re in a crowded space.  With that said, watch your step.  London Underground stations are one step up/down after another.  Whatever you do, don’t stop at the bottom of an escalator.  There are people behind you.  And, as you’ll hear over and over again – Mind The Gap.  No matter how famous the announcement is, there really are gaps between the trains and the platforms.

10. If You’re Unsure, Ask a Member of Staff for Help
London Underground stations are always busy but there are staff available if you’re a bit confused.  Even the well healed commuter gets discombobulated when there are thousands of others waiting to go through the ticket barriers.  TFL staff can guide you to your next destination, the nearest exit, tell you whether to turn left or right once you reach the bottom of the escalators and they may even tell you a joke.  Staff are located in several places before the ticket barrier as well as on the station platform.  Every station provides free Tube maps and information leaflets.

Plan your journey on the London Underground in advance with a free tube map.  Download your Free Tube Map.

Friday night’s in London are usually sacred.  The end of the week means relaxing at home after hectic days at work, or any number of after-hours activities.  You’re never short of things to do in London, especially if you are visiting for a short time.

That said, allow me to suggest ‘Friday Lates’ at the British Museum.  And, when I say lates, it’s only 8:30 pm late.  You’ll still have time for dinner afterwards and a night on the town.  Add a bit of culture Friday evenings when the museum hosts a nice range of lectures, discussions, film screenings, and special music and dance performances.  Most of the activities revolve around current exhibitions at the British Museum, so check what’s on before you go.

 Do keep in mind not all galleries are open during late hours at the British Museum, but rest assured you won’t be disappointed. Included below is the list of the galleries opened late on Fridays.  Feel free to download the list to take along with you during your visit.  

Why visit the British Museum on Friday night?  First of all, you’ll avoid the crowds.  With over eight million exhibits in the museum, it’ll be difficult to see it all and even more so with thousands of other visitors.  During the late opening, you can take your time whilst drinking in the vast amount of artefacts.  

The Egyptian collection is one of the finest (and largest) in the world.  When you have the museum to yourself, you’ll have the time to absorb the specially curated treasures.  You’ll discover stone tablets from the ancient Library of Alexandria, reliefs of lions from Assyria dating back to the seventh century, sculptures from the Parthenon, the first depiction of Jesus as well as artefacts recovered from the Sutton Hoo Viking ship burial.

The beauty of visiting the British Museum on a Friday night is you’ll avoid the throngs of people who nonsensically whip out their mobile phones for a selfie with the Rosetta Stone.  And if you are a consummate selfie-taker, you’ll have no fear of photo bombers.  Just don’t climb the Parthenon for your next viral selfie.  All joking aside, you can walk through one of the finest collections of humanity and enjoy your time in peace.  

I think your visit to the British Museum deserves the enriching experience you’ll have with few others around.  Walk through all the world’s continents and ancient eras of human development and civilisations.

I’ve visited the museum on several occasions after normal hours.  Each time I’ve captured interesting images of the Great Court, which is fascinating all by itself.  On this night, I basically had the British Museum to myself.

British Museum
Directions :
Located on Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, London. The entrance is a short walk from the Holborn and Tottenham Court Road Underground stations. 
OPENING TIMES
10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily  Fridays Open Till 8:30 pm

British Museum GPS Coordinates :  51.5194° N, 0.1270° W
Map Showing Location of the British Museum ::

 
List of British Museum Galleries Open Late on Fridays :: 

Africa
Africa 
The Sainsbury Galleries
Room 25

Americas
North America 
Room 26

Mexico 
Room 27

Ancient Egypt
Egyptian sculpture 
Room 4

Egyptian life and death: the tomb-chapel of Nebamun 
The Michael Cohen Gallery
Room 61

Egyptian death and afterlife: mummies 
The Roxie Walker Galleries
Room 62-63

Early Egypt 
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery
Room 64

Sudan, Egypt and Nubia 
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery
Room 65

Ethiopia and Coptic Egypt 
Room 66

Ancient Greece and Rome
Greece: Minoans 
The Arthur I Fleischman Gallery
Room 12a

Greece: Mycenaeans 
The Arthur I Fleischman Gallery
Room 12b

Greece 1050–520 BC 
Room 13

Greek Vases 
Room 14

Athens and Lycia 
Room 15

Nereid Monument 
Room 17

Greece: Parthenon 
Room 18

Halikarnassos 
Room 21

Alexander the Great 
Room 22

Greek and Roman sculpture 
Room 23

Greek and Roman life 
Room 69

Roman Empire 
The Wolfson Gallery
Room 70

Etruscan world 
Room 71

Ancient Cyprus 
The AG Leventis Gallery
Room 72

Greeks in Italy 
Room 73

Asia
China, South Asia and Southeast Asia 
The Joseph E Hotung Gallery
Room 33

India: Amaravati 
Room 33

Chinese Jade 
The Selwyn and Ellie Alleyne Gallery
Room 33b

Europe
Clocks and watches 
The Sir Harry and Lady Djanogly Gallery
Room 38-39

Medieval Europe 1050–1500 
The Sir Paul and Lady Ruddock Gallery
Room 40

Sutton Hoo and Europe, AD 300–1100 
The Sir Paul and Lady Ruddock Gallery
Room 41

Europe 1800–1900 
Room 47

Europe 1900 to the present 
Room 48

Roman Britain 
The Weston Gallery
Room 49

Britain and Europe 800 BC-AD 43 
Room 50

Europe and Middle East 10,000–800 BC 
Room 51

Middle East
Assyrian sculpture and Balawat Gates 
Room 6

Assyria: Nimrud 
Room 7-8

Assyria: Nineveh 
Room 9

Assyria: Lion hunts 
Room 10a

Assyria: Siege of Lachish 
Room 10b

Assyria Khorsabad 
Room 10c

Ancient Iran 
The Rahim Irvani Gallery
Room 52

Ancient South Arabia 
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery
Room 53

Ancient Turkey 
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery
Room 54

Mesopotamia 1500–539 BC 
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery
Room 55

Mesopotamia 6000–1500 BC 
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery
Room 56

Ancient Levant 
Room 57-59

Themes
Enlightenment 
Room 1

Collecting the World 
Room 2

Living and Dying 
The Wellcome Trust Gallery
Room 24

Money 
The Citi Money Gallery
Room 68

Having travelled the world so much, I’m all too familiar with tourists and how frustrating they can be. Sure, most are friendly and upbeat once you have the chance to meet them, but they don’t walk or talk with consideration to the locals, they’re finicky and tough to accommodate in restaurants, cause a cringe-worthy scene whenever a celebrity is around, and tend to display a general lack of situational awareness.  And what do they usually all have in common? They haven’t done their homework on local culture, which is the only way to seamlessly blend in with native strangers in unfamiliar territory. Feeling at home in a new city can be simple once you’ve studied up a bit, and it doesn’t take a ton of effort to appear respectful, in-the-know, and completely comfortable in new surroundings. No matter the destination on your suitcase tag, you can bet that a bit of preparation will make your transition go a lot more smoothly.

Study the Local Manners

Most people who haven’t ever left the United States would be shocked at how something as simple as a handshake can have all kinds of nuances depending on where in the world you’re travelling. So keep in mind that every country has its own unspoken social rules, manners, and customs. You can’t take it for granted that even your best manners will be understood or properly interpreted abroad. Before the landing gear deploys, you should be familiar with the local dos and don’ts of navigating and interacting with your temporary home. Learn how to greet people casually and respectfully, get familiar with proper local table manners, study up on what culturally taboo topics you’ll want to avoid, and memorize a few foreign language keywords you’ll need to get around to avoid fumbling through a translator app every time you need to ask for directions. This’ll make it simple to avoid stepping on any toes and will help to make each interaction with strangers a positive and memorable one.

Dress the Part

While you should always be comfortable and dress to your preference, it’s embarrassing (and potentially dangerous) to be labelled a gullible tourist at first glance. Looking too casual or travel-ready (I’m talking cargo pants, big backpacks, and gym sneakers) is a dead giveaway.

You can’t go wrong with well-fitting, slightly dressed-up gear in neutral colours. If it fits well and it has a collar, chances are it’ll look great no matter where you are. And avoid wearing flashy jewellery and accessories, or risk being a target for pickpockets. Yeah, your Rolex looks great and makes being on-time easier, but it’s probably not the best idea to flash it in a foreign environment where your street smarts are lessened.

Plan Your Menu

Authentic, local food is indisputably one of the best parts of travelling. And while playing it safe and sticking only to stuff you’re already familiar with (I’m talking to you, picky eaters) isn’t necessarily disrespectful or rude, it’s a massive missed opportunity. A trip to a new country is the perfect time to experiment with new cuisines impulsively, but it doesn’t hurt to get familiar with some of the local delicacies, and the way they’re commonly served and eaten before you arrive. So do a bit of research, make a short list of a few dishes your host city or country does best, and gravitate towards those when you bib up at a new restaurant. No need to memorize every dish or local ingredient; if you’re lost on what to order, it’s always an option to ask your server for a recommendation as long as you’re polite. With those details in mind, you’ll get more out of your trip – and then return home a more experienced, well-rounded traveller. Now, have fun out there. And don’t forget to grab meaningful memories to share with everybody back at home.

https://youtu.be/8i4LJ5UsREw

Ceremonies in Bail Temples include offerings to the gods, prayer, dances, music and feasts.   All members of a community – men, women and children play roles during a multi-day ceremony.  Hear children from the Tampaksiring area play familiar music as the adults perform in the main Temple.  Bali has its own “brand” of Hinduism which is reflected in everyday life.

Destination:  Bali